F#47: Unidentified (Keeley wants to call it Flufferus Pufferus, please don’t let that happen.)

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Keeley found this in the woods just outside of Revery (whilst she was on a routine trip to tag some migratory nightshade plants) and…well, we have no idea what it is.

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If it’s a newly discovered entity, that would unfortunately mean she gets to name it- and she’s planning to go with ‘Flufferous Pufferous’, which is a terrible idea and must be stopped.

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So I, Jesper Beattie, beseech you: do you recognise this creature? It seems to be young, and unable to fly much yet- we’re searching for a nest it might have fallen from.

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(Whippet pictured for size)

F#39: Frost Wyrm

(Frost Wyrm on etsy)

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The frost wyrm is a member of the dragon family- one of the smallest, measuring on average only 24cm long.

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These wyrms radiate cold- in lower temperatures, even enough to freeze the spot on which they are perched.

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For this reason they are unpopular with gardeners- woe betide any delicate stem that comes in contacts with the wyrm’s icy touch!

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However, seeing a frost wyrm can be a good sign- a wyrm in a sloe bush means the berries are ready for picking- or so says the old wives tale.

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F#38: Cornus Martes

Also known as the ‘weasel dragon’ (though it has no link to the dragon species, this name probably due to the similarity of some features to that of Asian lung dragons), this creature roams some of the coldest climes of the northern hemisphere, with particularly high populations in northern Russia, Iceland and Greenland.

In other places, however, the weasel dragon is kept as a pet.

It is effective at keeping down mice, rat and rabbit populations, and also is an affectionate companion.

Hope you enjoyed this post! Today I’m off to Gloucester to run my market stall for a whole week! Unfortunately that means there won’t be a new creature on here next sunday- but check in to see some creature design sketches! 

F#36: Phoot

Bird feeders watch out! The Phoot is about- and it’s stocking up for the winter!

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During October and November, the phoot consumes nearly three times its body weight DAILY, in preparation for its hibernation from December to march.

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It’s during this time of feasting that you can best hear the distinctive call that gives it its name: ffff-oot! ffff-oot!

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So consider putting extra on your bird table this year- to give the birds a chance.

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F#33: Ornamental Hippogriff (wingless)

(Ornamental Hippogriff on etsy)

First brought to the Britain by the Victorians, the ornamental hippogriff still wanders the grand estate grounds and parkland- and the countryside, as they quickly escaped captivity and flourished independently.

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Unlike their large winged cousins, who thrive in cold climates, this breed of small hippogriff prefers mild winters; they keep their short, soft fur all year ’round and don’t grow the distinctive thick white fur that true hippogriffs are known for.

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Avid insectivores, these creatures are a great solution to garden pests- particularly fond of slugs and caterpillars.

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Due to their association with wealth and land, they often appear on heraldry and in portraits: a symbol of fortune.

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F#32: Woodsprites

(This creature is available for adoption on etsy!)

Woodsprites are there all year round, but it’s in the autumn that their population explodes. That’s when it’s time to gather them up from the overpopulated woods, and spread them out a bit.

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They may be curious and playful, but they aren’t the smartest creatures, and need a hand so that their habitats don’t get crowded out.

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Sprites are gentle nature spirits, and like to spend their time exploring, eating and sleeping. The live on a diet of tree bark, sap and nuts and berries.

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No two sprites look the same, with their own individual markings and features- though some of these do crop up more than others.

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Sprites make for affectionate companions, and will happily adjust to house and garden living.

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They like having new places to explore!

 

 

 

 

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F#25: Devilmite

I was eating breakfast when I heard it: a rustling in the pantry. Best case scenario: it was a foraging venomstriker; worst case scenario: I had mice.

Turns out, it wasn’t either of those: when I opened the cuboard; armed with a glass and a roll of newspaper, I found this little guy:

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This is a devilmite, so named for its horned appearance and tendency to steal food. (i.e. Begone, devilmite!)

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It was obviously used to people, and didn’t make a fuss when I took it outside- it even stuck around to suss me out, before scooting over the wall next door (A bakery, where it will probably decimate their stock. Oops.)

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F#17: Seafoam Dragon

Seafoam dragon (Draconis Nausicaa)

Aquatic fauna

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The seafoam dragon is native to the Mediterranean sea, but this one showed up in Revery Harbour after a massive storm- she must have been blown off course.

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This small aquatic dragon has long webbed forefingers, perfect for breaking open tightly closed shellfish and mollusks. They breathe both underwater and out of it, and lay their eggs in the sand like turtles. A clutch normally consists of five, one to three of which are expected to hatch. Once all the surviving eggs hatch, the parent leads the hatchlings to the water, and they stay in the sandy shallows for a few days before venturing further out.

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Entry compiled by: Jesper Beattie

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