F#43: Mottled Cohuatl

SFI recieved a call from a house near the Leywood- someone concerned about a tiny nest in their garden. We get a lot of calls like this- people worry that something dangerous is making a home in their backyard.

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But this time, we were pleased to report, that is not the case. This anxious parent showed up to check that we weren’t up to something with their potential offspring!

This is a mottled cohuatl- the smallest member of the winged serpent family.

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Immediately, the cohuatl lured us away from their nest with a performance of fluttering and acrobatics. As the nest was in a safe location, and the neighbours were reassured that the occupants were friendly, we left them to it.

F#24: Domestic Manticore Kitten

‘Beep’ Domesticated Manticore Mardyakhor Mansueti

 There are many reasons why people might rehome a manticore bred by Eliza Knights-Herbert of 23 Rose Street, Revery. Most of these reasons relate back to their finicky personailities, or the ability to dissolve things just by looking at them.

Beep, however, was left with us at the institute because she is blind. Her previous family were displeased with her lack of laser vision, and feared she would no longer be an effective burgalar deterrent- a legitimate concern.

Luckily, Beep has found a new forever home, and will only be staying with us briefly before travelling to Gloucestershire- our resident manticore Percy will miss her.

F#23: Wyrm Hatchlings

Wyrm Hatchlings (Northen European Wyrm) 

Dragon species

When we got the call about an ‘infestation of worms’, we might have reacted a mite too hastily with our stock (polite!) ‘we are a research institute, not Revery Pest Control’ response.




After the miscommunication was cleared up, we arrived at a small garden in the suburbs- only to find these week-old specimens of the European small wyrm causing havoc and destruction in their pursuit of a Sunday dinner.

These dragons are rarely found in built up areas (and almost never in the south of England) and there was no sign of the parent wyrm, who normally feeds young in the nest until they are a month old. It seemed as if the babies had been fending for themselves for a few days- feeding on insects and tearing up the garden in the process.



After a short (but chaotic) pursuit, Evelyn and I caught all three at the same time and took them back to the institute.


They have settled down in the break room in Keeley’s hat, whilst we contact the South West Dragon Centre to see if they have a spare pen…

F#09: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Name: Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

Class: Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: This medium sized member of the Avum Pilosus (Griffin) species has glossy black and white plumage with a distinctive blue/green sheen; and long tail feathers.

Notes: The most common Griffin to see in the wild, found across Europe and Asia. The Magpie Griffin is omnivorous, eating insects, fruit, seeds, carrion, eggs and young birds.

It is also considered to be one of the most intelligent of the species, capable of complex emotion, social rituals and use of tools. They are rarely seen alone, remaining in tightly knit groups consisting of up to five families. In some urban areas, these noisy, raucous flocks are considered vermin.

 

Entry Compiled by: Jesper Beattie

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Magpie Griffin (Pica Avum Pilousus)

F#06: Moonskims

Name: Moonskim

Class: Neutral

Designation: Fauna

Description: Bat-like, the moonskim has a furry body and leathery wings. Not so bat-like: four legs (Note by JB: rear legs border upon vestigial) and large eyes that appear to have no pupil. (Note by JB: magnification of the eye shows minuscule pupil) (Note by KC: Jesper, if you want to write this entry you could just say so).

The moonskim has large ears, and needle-like teeth that bite like a (word redacted) (Note by KC: Really?).

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Fig.A: Field sketch of moonskim and nest

Notes: Diet consisting of insects, the moonskim thrives in marshy conditions where there is plenty of food most of the year round. Unlike bats, they are nest builders; using mud and dead plant matter to construct pods that cling to the trunks of trees (see fig.A).

(Note by JB: This entry seems a little sparse) (Note by KC: They are basically bats, Jesper. Invisible magic bats. What more can I say? I’m a botanist.)
Entry Compiled by: Keeley Claremont, and Jesper Beattie, apparently.

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