F#37: Hamadryad

The Hamadryad is a subspecies of dryad, itself a type of nymph.

Thoroughly documented by the ancient Greeks, hamadryads dwell within trees.

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Though they have a physical form, they are born bonded to their one particular tree, and may never leave it.

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Should the tree die, the hamadryad dies with it- and vice versa.

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Like many nymphs, hamadryads enjoy music and dancing, though they are more reclusive and shy than other species.

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This particular specimen is the hamadryad of a cherry tree. Like its host’s winter branches it now looks bare and stick-like. Come spring, tiny blossoms will begin to sprout along its limbs.

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F35: The Sock-Eating Monster

Diet: Socks, underwear, pencils, pens, assorted household items, Jesper’s car keys

Habitat: Under Katerina’s bed

Sock Eater available on etsy!

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Hello! My name is Katerina, and this is my monster. I caught him myself. I am six.

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The sock monster lived under my bed, and ate my stuff. Sometimes I give him the crusts off my sandwiches, because I don’t like them.

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He is shy of adults, but comes out when it’s just me. He ate all the crayons in my box.

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I was in trouble a bit for feeding him. When I grow up I want to be scientist like my uncle Jesper. That’s why I fed him, and took notes of all the things he ate:

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He sleeps most of the day, and comes out at night because he’s nocturnal. He only has two legs, and Uncle Jesper says that’s bipedal. His tail is very strong.

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Sock Eater available on etsy!

F#34: Fire Imp

Also called: Hairy Imp / Firelighter / Little Arsonist

Chaotic elemental creature

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As the evening draw in and winter creeps closer, fires are rekindled in homes across the country- and with them comes this little mischief maker.

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Watch out for your leaf piles, as cute and happy as they look, all it takes is some nice dry tinder and the fire imp will have it alight in moments.

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Widely considered a pest (and health and safety issue), any place of buisiness that has an open fire is subject to strict regulations, inspections, and mandatory anti-elemental warding.

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F#33: Ornamental Hippogriff (wingless)

(Ornamental Hippogriff on etsy)

First brought to the Britain by the Victorians, the ornamental hippogriff still wanders the grand estate grounds and parkland- and the countryside, as they quickly escaped captivity and flourished independently.

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Unlike their large winged cousins, who thrive in cold climates, this breed of small hippogriff prefers mild winters; they keep their short, soft fur all year ’round and don’t grow the distinctive thick white fur that true hippogriffs are known for.

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Avid insectivores, these creatures are a great solution to garden pests- particularly fond of slugs and caterpillars.

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Due to their association with wealth and land, they often appear on heraldry and in portraits: a symbol of fortune.

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F#32: Woodsprites

(This creature is available for adoption on etsy!)

Woodsprites are there all year round, but it’s in the autumn that their population explodes. That’s when it’s time to gather them up from the overpopulated woods, and spread them out a bit.

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They may be curious and playful, but they aren’t the smartest creatures, and need a hand so that their habitats don’t get crowded out.

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Sprites are gentle nature spirits, and like to spend their time exploring, eating and sleeping. The live on a diet of tree bark, sap and nuts and berries.

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No two sprites look the same, with their own individual markings and features- though some of these do crop up more than others.

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Sprites make for affectionate companions, and will happily adjust to house and garden living.

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They like having new places to explore!

 

 

 

 

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